Instructors

Ellie Alexander-Loomis

Skeinanigans (Ellie) is a neurodivergent queer maker who enjoys long blocks of stockinette and fixing mistakes without having to frog. They work as a full-time knitwear designer on beautiful Whidbey Island in Washington State, where they love creating modular and size-inclusive patterns for the curious knitter.

Michele Lee Bernstein

Michele Lee Bernstein, PDXKnitterati, designs and teaches from her home base in Portland, Oregon. She designs accessories that use interesting techniques (brioche, lace, fancy stitches) to make small objects sing. Her patterns are available through Ravelry and Payhip.

Michele loves teaching knitters to be the boss of their knitting! She teaches at fiber festivals (Vogue Knitting Live, Red Alder Fiber Arts Festival, Oregon Flock and Fiber Festival), guild meetings, retreats, and local yarn shops. Her book, Brioche Knit Love: 21 Skill Building Projects from Simple to Sublime combines her love for teaching and designing, using simple accessories to take knitters from the easiest one color brioche through more complex brioche techniques.

Michele blogs at PDXKnitterati.com. You can also find her on Instagram, Facebook, Ravelry, YouTube, and Twitter; she’s PDXKnitterati on all platforms.

Beth Brown-Reinsel

Beth Brown-Reinsel has been teaching historic and traditional knitting workshops nationally, as well as internationally, for over 30 years. Her book Knitting Ganseys has been deemed a classic, and a new, revised edition was released in 2018. She has created 3 DVDs as well as a Craftsy/BluPrint class, and her articles and designs have appeared in the major knitting magazines. She continues to design for her own pattern line Knitting Traditions and holds two retreats in Vermont every year. Beth’s website can be found at www.knittingtraditions.com. She lives in Vermont and loves New England winters!

Henry and Roy Clemes

A lifelong woodworker and small business owner, Henry has been building fiber art equipment for over 45 years and drum carders for 38 years. Roy grew up in his family’s woodshop and started by sweeping floors at the age of 5. Together they have introduced many innovations to the fiber arts community and their equipment is known for being not only thoughtfully engineered but visually pleasing and durable as well. They regularly consult and instruct spinners, felters, fiber growers, and professional fiber artists in the use of drum carders for fiber prep.

Amy Detjen

Amy was the “List Mom” of the original Knit List for over four years before she started KnitU. She’s very proud that she’s been Meg Swansen’s assistant at her Knitting Camp for 20 years. Teaching knitting and helping people learn about the wide range of knitting possibilities is something Amy is passionate about, and she loves solving those stubborn knitting problems!

Kira Dulaney

Kira Dulaney has been teaching fiber arts classes and hosting crafty events in the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond since 2002. As a teacher, her focus is on providing valuable information in a stress-free environment, and supporting students through the learning process. She is also the designer behind Kira K Designs, a line of original knitting and crochet patterns and kits featuring clean lines and intriguing details that are both interesting to make and easy to wear. Kira has taught at Estes Park Wool Market, Interweave Yarn Fest, Lambtown Festival, the Natural Fiber Fair, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival, Stitches events, and TNNA, as well as numerous guilds and yarn shops.

Stephenie Gaustad

For 45 years, Stephenie Gaustad has spun, woven and dyed. She Illustrated “The Big Book of Handspinning”, and wrote “A Practical Spinners Guide to Cotton, Flax and Hemp”. She shares her love for the fiber arts teaching across the United States and Canada and writing for SpinOff, Shuttle Spindle and Dyepot and Ply magazines. Her most recent book came out mid –year 2020, “A Spinners’ Dozen”.

Sivia Harding

Sivia Harding has worked with fiber and art since she can remember. Obsessed since youth, by adulthood she had dabbled in weaving, spinning, and dyeing among other activities, and came to knitting in the year 2000. Almost immediately, she began to design. She is known mainly for her exceptional lace and bead designs. Her patterns also include accessories, garments, and imaginative Moebius creations. She has been widely published in books and collections, including Jared Flood’s Wool People series, online magazines such as Twist Collective and Knitty, and on Ravelry as Sivia Harding Knit Design.

Michael Jennrich

Michael has been a weaver for over thirty years.  Although Tapestry has been his focus, he is also an accomplished band weaver and is skilled in Swedish Drawloom weaving and Shaft-Switching Techniques.  Michael began his weaving career in the Southwest studying with Karen Martinez, Lezlie King, James Kohler and Elizabeth Buckley.  Later, he studied with Becky Ashenden at the Vavstuga Weaving School in Massachusetts.  He has shared his love for Tapestry through presentations and classes with various Weaving Guilds and is currently teaching Tapestry at a University in the Midwest.

Michael Kelson

Michael Kelson (https://spinpossible.com/) teaches spinning classes all over the country. His methodical, sample-based approach to spinning resonates with students of all levels. Michael is the coordinator for the annual Seattle-area Men’s Fall Knitting Retreat and the Seattle Men Who Knit meet-up. By day he is a software professional, but on weekends he’s usually out and about with his eSpinner in tow.

Kate Larson

Kate Larson loves using fiber arts as a bridge between art and agriculture. She is the editor of Spin Off and the author of The Practical Spinner’s Guide: Wool (Interweave, 2015) and several videos, including How to Spin Yarn to Knit. Her work has appeared in Spin Off, Jane Austen Knits, and more. Follow her woolly adventures at KateLarsonTextiles.com.

Patty Lyons

PATTY LYONS (http://pattylyons.com/) is a nationally recognized knitting teacher and technique expert who is known for teaching the “why” not just the “how” in her pursuit of training the “mindful knitter”. She specializes in sweater design and sharing her love of the much-maligned subjects of gauge and blocking.

Patty teaches nationally at guilds, shops & knitting shows around the country. Her popular classes can also be found on DVD and digitally available through her website. She also runs wildly popular video sweater classes on her education platform Education.pattylyons.com.

Patty designs and knitting skill articles have been published in Vogue Knitting, Interweave Knits, Knit Purl, Knitter’s Magazine, Cast On, Knit Style, Creative Knitting, Twist Collective and Modern Daily Knitting where she writes a monthly knitter’s advice column: “Ask Patty”. Patty’s designs have also been included in pattern collections from Classic Elite, Noro, Cascade, Tahki Stacy Charles, Sugar Bush and Willow Yarns.

Judith MacKenzie

Judith is the ultimate textile artist and teacher. With an in-depth understanding of every aspect of spinning, weaving, knitting, and dyeing, her classes and company are highly sought after. Her teaching career spans the globe from the Arctic Circle to Turkey. She is the author of Teach Yourself Visually: Handspinning and The Intentional Spinner, several videos, and countless stories.

John Mullarkey

John Mullarkey is passionate about teaching tablet weaving and exploring new ways to make the art form more contemporary. Tablet weaving is a primitive weaving style that creates simple weave structures, but offers great variation in possible patterns. John loves to push tablet weaving outside the normal and historical limits to create his own interpretation of traditional patterns. He is a nationally recognized teacher and is valued for the patience, clarity and organization he brings to his classes. After beginning to teach in 2009, John left a part-time software development career to focus on weaving and teach full time.

John has won many awards, is a frequent contributor to national weaving publications and has authored books and videos about the craft. His creations have appeared in international fashion shows and been displayed at museums. The Schacht Zoom Loom is based on John’s design.

Xandy Peters

Xandy Peters is a knitting designer and teacher, best known as the innovator of the stacked stitch technique and for the Fox Paws pattern. Starting out as a footwear and product designer, Xandy turned to knitting as a way to explore textiles and surfaces without using factory production and has since made a career out of publishing new patterns and teaching workshops. Xandy has been published in magazines such as Vogue Knitting, Twist Collective, Knitscene, Knitty, and Pom Pom Quarterly, has a Bluprint class teaching the stacked stitch technique and continues to self publish patterns monthly. Xandy also blogs about design, crafting, and baking on soimakestuff.com and posts craft videos on YouTube.

Alisdair Headshot

Alasdair Post-Quinn

Alasdair is a computer technician in the Boston area who spends much of his spare time as a knitting designer, focusing specifically on double-knitting, a technique that creates a fabric with no wrong side.

Alasdair is among those on the forefront of innovation in double-knitting.  His books, entitled Extreme Double-Knitting and Double or Nothing, documents his repertoire of esoteric double-knitting techniques.

Website: http://www.double-knitting.com

John Whitley

John started his journey with braiding in 2008. Where his first attempt at learning knitting failed, kumihimo stuck hard. He has studied with Makiko Tada, Rodrick Owen, and Jennie Parry, among others.  He owns all the books, and has actually read them.  He’s officially demonstrated kumihimo at Madrona Fiber Arts for years, and unofficially for years before that.  He designs and builds his own variations on the traditional braiding stands, and is looking forward to starting production in his own shop in 2020.

Jennifer Williams

Jennifer Williams is a passionate band weaver and teacher. She has spent many years exploring band weaving techniques practiced around the world, many of which she interprets for the inkle loom, her favorite loom. Her work can be found in Handwoven Magazine’s Easy Weaving with Little Looms and on her blog InkledPink.com.